Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

 The one and only Johnny Mac, photographed at Crusher Pool in The Forks, Maine. At the age of 65, this is Johnny’s 34th consecutive season as a river guide. Normally a job associated with younger people, Johnny doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. “I always said I’d do this until I wasn’t having fun anymore.” He sure seems like he’s still having a good time on the river.

The one and only Johnny Mac, photographed at Crusher Pool in The Forks, Maine. At the age of 65, this is Johnny’s 34th consecutive season as a river guide. Normally a job associated with younger people, Johnny doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. “I always said I’d do this until I wasn’t having fun anymore.” He sure seems like he’s still having a good time on the river.

 George Dunn, 85, has had a lifelong passion for flying. He first got his license in 1952 and now shares that passion with seven other members of his family who fly and own planes, including his son who now flies KC-135s for the Air National Guard in Bangor. He and his family, known as “The Flying Dunn’s,” have been part of the Beech Hill Pond community for several years—Dunn has lived on the pond, year round, for more than 45 years and hosts an annual Fourth of July event at his hanger that draws more than 1,000 people each year. 

George Dunn, 85, has had a lifelong passion for flying. He first got his license in 1952 and now shares that passion with seven other members of his family who fly and own planes, including his son who now flies KC-135s for the Air National Guard in Bangor. He and his family, known as “The Flying Dunn’s,” have been part of the Beech Hill Pond community for several years—Dunn has lived on the pond, year round, for more than 45 years and hosts an annual Fourth of July event at his hanger that draws more than 1,000 people each year. 

 Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

 Everard Hall, 72, of Milbridge, Maine. Hall has been digging graves by hand for more than 50 years, and has buried more than 2,400 souls during his work as a gravedigger, including many family members and friends.

Everard Hall, 72, of Milbridge, Maine. Hall has been digging graves by hand for more than 50 years, and has buried more than 2,400 souls during his work as a gravedigger, including many family members and friends.

 Gillian Rose, 88, of Orono, Maine. Rose estimates she’s logged approximately 1K miles on her bike so far this year. In the colder months of the year she stays busy on cross country ski trails. “You do as much as you can for as long as you can,” Rose said. 

Gillian Rose, 88, of Orono, Maine. Rose estimates she’s logged approximately 1K miles on her bike so far this year. In the colder months of the year she stays busy on cross country ski trails. “You do as much as you can for as long as you can,” Rose said. 

 Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

 Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational. 

Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational. 

 Robin Emery, 72, of Lamoine, Maine has been running races for more than 50 years and logged enough miles to circumnavigate the globe one and a half times. Participating in approximately 30 races a year and running every day, she has pushed through physical adversity, such as once suffering a frozen eyeball due to weather conditions (she now runs with ski goggles in colder temps), and also broken through societal norms. When Robin signed up to run her first race in 1972, she was the first woman to ever enter the race. “Women weren’t supposed to sweat or be competitive then,” she said. “It wasn’t feminine.” After entering the race and completing it three years in a row, she was finally given recognition: a basketball trophy, with a man on top. Photographed here in the garage of her family’s home since the early 1900s, Robin’s house is now filled with a life story of trophies, medals, race photos , plaques and memories from the myriad races she’s won and participated in over the decades. Robin, who also was an elementary school teacher for more than 50 years, has a long-standing legacy in Maine. She was the second woman to ever be inducted into the Maine Running Hall of Fame, and also has a trophy named after her at that same Labor Day race.

Robin Emery, 72, of Lamoine, Maine has been running races for more than 50 years and logged enough miles to circumnavigate the globe one and a half times. Participating in approximately 30 races a year and running every day, she has pushed through physical adversity, such as once suffering a frozen eyeball due to weather conditions (she now runs with ski goggles in colder temps), and also broken through societal norms. When Robin signed up to run her first race in 1972, she was the first woman to ever enter the race. “Women weren’t supposed to sweat or be competitive then,” she said. “It wasn’t feminine.” After entering the race and completing it three years in a row, she was finally given recognition: a basketball trophy, with a man on top. Photographed here in the garage of her family’s home since the early 1900s, Robin’s house is now filled with a life story of trophies, medals, race photos , plaques and memories from the myriad races she’s won and participated in over the decades. Robin, who also was an elementary school teacher for more than 50 years, has a long-standing legacy in Maine. She was the second woman to ever be inducted into the Maine Running Hall of Fame, and also has a trophy named after her at that same Labor Day race.

 The one and only Johnny Mac, photographed at Crusher Pool in The Forks, Maine. At the age of 65, this is Johnny’s 34th consecutive season as a river guide. Normally a job associated with younger people, Johnny doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. “I always said I’d do this until I wasn’t having fun anymore.” He sure seems like he’s still having a good time on the river.

The one and only Johnny Mac, photographed at Crusher Pool in The Forks, Maine. At the age of 65, this is Johnny’s 34th consecutive season as a river guide. Normally a job associated with younger people, Johnny doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. “I always said I’d do this until I wasn’t having fun anymore.” He sure seems like he’s still having a good time on the river.

 Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

 Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational.

Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational.

 Ed Hendrickson, 98, of Brewer, Maine, still plans to do some downhill skiing once the snow starts to fly; in 2003 Hendrickson was the recipient of Sugarloaf’s Paul Schipper’s Iron Man Award. While he's been an avid skier most of his life and the dean of students at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute for 17 years, he was also a naval dive-bomber in WWII. Ed flew (and on a couple occasions) had to crash-land planes he was flying. In combat Hendrickson flew SB2C Helldivers. Over the span of just a few days, he shot down one enemy plane only to be hit by enemy fire a couple days later, losing his landing gear on one side, and crash-landing on an aircraft carrier--just the 14th aircraft carrier ever built, according to Hendrickson. "After they took the gun camera off the plane, they just pushed it overboard," he said. "That's just how they did things." On a previous occasion he wasn't able to land on the carrier and ended up careening off into a lake, where he narrowly escaped being dragged 130 feet to the bottom with his plane. That particular plane, a Douglass SBD Dauntless, was brought back to the surface in the 1990s and now can be seen on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida. 

Ed Hendrickson, 98, of Brewer, Maine, still plans to do some downhill skiing once the snow starts to fly; in 2003 Hendrickson was the recipient of Sugarloaf’s Paul Schipper’s Iron Man Award. While he's been an avid skier most of his life and the dean of students at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute for 17 years, he was also a naval dive-bomber in WWII. Ed flew (and on a couple occasions) had to crash-land planes he was flying. In combat Hendrickson flew SB2C Helldivers. Over the span of just a few days, he shot down one enemy plane only to be hit by enemy fire a couple days later, losing his landing gear on one side, and crash-landing on an aircraft carrier--just the 14th aircraft carrier ever built, according to Hendrickson. "After they took the gun camera off the plane, they just pushed it overboard," he said. "That's just how they did things." On a previous occasion he wasn't able to land on the carrier and ended up careening off into a lake, where he narrowly escaped being dragged 130 feet to the bottom with his plane. That particular plane, a Douglass SBD Dauntless, was brought back to the surface in the 1990s and now can be seen on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida. 

 Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

 Everard Hall, 72, of Milbridge, Maine. Hall has been digging graves by hand for more than 50 years, and has buried more than 2,400 souls during his work as a gravedigger, including many family members and friends.

Everard Hall, 72, of Milbridge, Maine. Hall has been digging graves by hand for more than 50 years, and has buried more than 2,400 souls during his work as a gravedigger, including many family members and friends.

 Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

 Gillian Rose, 88, of Orono, Maine. Rose estimates she’s logged approximately 1K miles on her bike so far this year. In the colder months of the year she stays busy on cross country ski trails. “You do as much as you can for as long as you can,” Rose said.

Gillian Rose, 88, of Orono, Maine. Rose estimates she’s logged approximately 1K miles on her bike so far this year. In the colder months of the year she stays busy on cross country ski trails. “You do as much as you can for as long as you can,” Rose said.

 George Dunn and his wife Donna have been together 63 years and living on the pond for more than 45 of those years. George Dunn, 85, has had a lifelong passion for flying. He first got his license in 1952 and now shares that passion with seven other members of his family who fly and own planes, including his son who now flies KC-135s for the Air National Guard in Bangor. He and his family, known as “The Flying Dunn’s,” have been part of the Beech Hill Pond community for several years—Dunn has lived on the pond, year round, for more than 45 years and hosts an annual Fourth of July event at his hanger that draws more than 1,000 people each year.

George Dunn and his wife Donna have been together 63 years and living on the pond for more than 45 of those years. George Dunn, 85, has had a lifelong passion for flying. He first got his license in 1952 and now shares that passion with seven other members of his family who fly and own planes, including his son who now flies KC-135s for the Air National Guard in Bangor. He and his family, known as “The Flying Dunn’s,” have been part of the Beech Hill Pond community for several years—Dunn has lived on the pond, year round, for more than 45 years and hosts an annual Fourth of July event at his hanger that draws more than 1,000 people each year.

 Ed Hendrickson, 98, of Brewer, Maine, still plans to do some downhill skiing once the snow starts to fly; in 2003 Hendrickson was the recipient of Sugarloaf’s Paul Schipper’s Iron Man Award. While he's been an avid skier most of his life and the dean of students at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute for 17 years, he was also a naval dive-bomber in WWII. Ed flew (and on a couple occasions) had to crash-land planes he was flying. In combat Hendrickson flew SB2C Helldivers. Over the span of just a few days, he shot down one enemy plane only to be hit by enemy fire a couple days later, losing his landing gear on one side, and crash-landing on an aircraft carrier--just the 14th aircraft carrier ever built, according to Hendrickson. "After they took the gun camera off the plane, they just pushed it overboard," he said. "That's just how they did things." On a previous occasion he wasn't able to land on the carrier and ended up careening off into a lake, where he narrowly escaped being dragged 130 feet to the bottom with his plane. That particular plane, a Douglass SBD Dauntless, was brought back to the surface in the 1990s and now can be seen on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida.

Ed Hendrickson, 98, of Brewer, Maine, still plans to do some downhill skiing once the snow starts to fly; in 2003 Hendrickson was the recipient of Sugarloaf’s Paul Schipper’s Iron Man Award. While he's been an avid skier most of his life and the dean of students at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute for 17 years, he was also a naval dive-bomber in WWII. Ed flew (and on a couple occasions) had to crash-land planes he was flying. In combat Hendrickson flew SB2C Helldivers. Over the span of just a few days, he shot down one enemy plane only to be hit by enemy fire a couple days later, losing his landing gear on one side, and crash-landing on an aircraft carrier--just the 14th aircraft carrier ever built, according to Hendrickson. "After they took the gun camera off the plane, they just pushed it overboard," he said. "That's just how they did things." On a previous occasion he wasn't able to land on the carrier and ended up careening off into a lake, where he narrowly escaped being dragged 130 feet to the bottom with his plane. That particular plane, a Douglass SBD Dauntless, was brought back to the surface in the 1990s and now can be seen on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida.

 Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational.

Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational.

 Third generation miner Frank C. Perham, 84, in West Paris, Maine. The family tradition all started when his grandfather’s cows, moving from one area of a field to another, helped unearth a large feldspar deposit. From there, his grandfather helped get the feldspar mill going in 1926 and his father, Stanley, started a mineral store in 1919. Frank worked with his father when he was growing up and, like his father, earned a geology degree from Bates College. In the 1950s Frank also served a tour in Korea and became very skilled with explosives. Being good at placing explosives gave him work with the state of Maine for road construction projects, but also gave him the opportunity to mine on weekends. The pockets he’s found over the years and discoveries he has made now sit on display at both The Smithsonian and as close as the Maine Mineral and Gem Museum in Bethel, Maine. Frank has given many lectures over the years and also has created a display of many of his finds in the basement of his home, where people stop in to hear his many stories and learn about Maine’s minerals from someone with an unbridled passion for minerals and lifetime of experiences.

Third generation miner Frank C. Perham, 84, in West Paris, Maine. The family tradition all started when his grandfather’s cows, moving from one area of a field to another, helped unearth a large feldspar deposit. From there, his grandfather helped get the feldspar mill going in 1926 and his father, Stanley, started a mineral store in 1919. Frank worked with his father when he was growing up and, like his father, earned a geology degree from Bates College. In the 1950s Frank also served a tour in Korea and became very skilled with explosives. Being good at placing explosives gave him work with the state of Maine for road construction projects, but also gave him the opportunity to mine on weekends. The pockets he’s found over the years and discoveries he has made now sit on display at both The Smithsonian and as close as the Maine Mineral and Gem Museum in Bethel, Maine. Frank has given many lectures over the years and also has created a display of many of his finds in the basement of his home, where people stop in to hear his many stories and learn about Maine’s minerals from someone with an unbridled passion for minerals and lifetime of experiences.

 Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.
 The one and only Johnny Mac, photographed at Crusher Pool in The Forks, Maine. At the age of 65, this is Johnny’s 34th consecutive season as a river guide. Normally a job associated with younger people, Johnny doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. “I always said I’d do this until I wasn’t having fun anymore.” He sure seems like he’s still having a good time on the river.
 George Dunn, 85, has had a lifelong passion for flying. He first got his license in 1952 and now shares that passion with seven other members of his family who fly and own planes, including his son who now flies KC-135s for the Air National Guard in Bangor. He and his family, known as “The Flying Dunn’s,” have been part of the Beech Hill Pond community for several years—Dunn has lived on the pond, year round, for more than 45 years and hosts an annual Fourth of July event at his hanger that draws more than 1,000 people each year. 
 Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.
 Everard Hall, 72, of Milbridge, Maine. Hall has been digging graves by hand for more than 50 years, and has buried more than 2,400 souls during his work as a gravedigger, including many family members and friends.
 Gillian Rose, 88, of Orono, Maine. Rose estimates she’s logged approximately 1K miles on her bike so far this year. In the colder months of the year she stays busy on cross country ski trails. “You do as much as you can for as long as you can,” Rose said. 
 Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.
 Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational. 
 Robin Emery, 72, of Lamoine, Maine has been running races for more than 50 years and logged enough miles to circumnavigate the globe one and a half times. Participating in approximately 30 races a year and running every day, she has pushed through physical adversity, such as once suffering a frozen eyeball due to weather conditions (she now runs with ski goggles in colder temps), and also broken through societal norms. When Robin signed up to run her first race in 1972, she was the first woman to ever enter the race. “Women weren’t supposed to sweat or be competitive then,” she said. “It wasn’t feminine.” After entering the race and completing it three years in a row, she was finally given recognition: a basketball trophy, with a man on top. Photographed here in the garage of her family’s home since the early 1900s, Robin’s house is now filled with a life story of trophies, medals, race photos , plaques and memories from the myriad races she’s won and participated in over the decades. Robin, who also was an elementary school teacher for more than 50 years, has a long-standing legacy in Maine. She was the second woman to ever be inducted into the Maine Running Hall of Fame, and also has a trophy named after her at that same Labor Day race.
 The one and only Johnny Mac, photographed at Crusher Pool in The Forks, Maine. At the age of 65, this is Johnny’s 34th consecutive season as a river guide. Normally a job associated with younger people, Johnny doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. “I always said I’d do this until I wasn’t having fun anymore.” He sure seems like he’s still having a good time on the river.
 Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.
 Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational.
 Ed Hendrickson, 98, of Brewer, Maine, still plans to do some downhill skiing once the snow starts to fly; in 2003 Hendrickson was the recipient of Sugarloaf’s Paul Schipper’s Iron Man Award. While he's been an avid skier most of his life and the dean of students at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute for 17 years, he was also a naval dive-bomber in WWII. Ed flew (and on a couple occasions) had to crash-land planes he was flying. In combat Hendrickson flew SB2C Helldivers. Over the span of just a few days, he shot down one enemy plane only to be hit by enemy fire a couple days later, losing his landing gear on one side, and crash-landing on an aircraft carrier--just the 14th aircraft carrier ever built, according to Hendrickson. "After they took the gun camera off the plane, they just pushed it overboard," he said. "That's just how they did things." On a previous occasion he wasn't able to land on the carrier and ended up careening off into a lake, where he narrowly escaped being dragged 130 feet to the bottom with his plane. That particular plane, a Douglass SBD Dauntless, was brought back to the surface in the 1990s and now can be seen on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida. 
 Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.
 Everard Hall, 72, of Milbridge, Maine. Hall has been digging graves by hand for more than 50 years, and has buried more than 2,400 souls during his work as a gravedigger, including many family members and friends.
 Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.
 Gillian Rose, 88, of Orono, Maine. Rose estimates she’s logged approximately 1K miles on her bike so far this year. In the colder months of the year she stays busy on cross country ski trails. “You do as much as you can for as long as you can,” Rose said.
 George Dunn and his wife Donna have been together 63 years and living on the pond for more than 45 of those years. George Dunn, 85, has had a lifelong passion for flying. He first got his license in 1952 and now shares that passion with seven other members of his family who fly and own planes, including his son who now flies KC-135s for the Air National Guard in Bangor. He and his family, known as “The Flying Dunn’s,” have been part of the Beech Hill Pond community for several years—Dunn has lived on the pond, year round, for more than 45 years and hosts an annual Fourth of July event at his hanger that draws more than 1,000 people each year.
 Ed Hendrickson, 98, of Brewer, Maine, still plans to do some downhill skiing once the snow starts to fly; in 2003 Hendrickson was the recipient of Sugarloaf’s Paul Schipper’s Iron Man Award. While he's been an avid skier most of his life and the dean of students at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute for 17 years, he was also a naval dive-bomber in WWII. Ed flew (and on a couple occasions) had to crash-land planes he was flying. In combat Hendrickson flew SB2C Helldivers. Over the span of just a few days, he shot down one enemy plane only to be hit by enemy fire a couple days later, losing his landing gear on one side, and crash-landing on an aircraft carrier--just the 14th aircraft carrier ever built, according to Hendrickson. "After they took the gun camera off the plane, they just pushed it overboard," he said. "That's just how they did things." On a previous occasion he wasn't able to land on the carrier and ended up careening off into a lake, where he narrowly escaped being dragged 130 feet to the bottom with his plane. That particular plane, a Douglass SBD Dauntless, was brought back to the surface in the 1990s and now can be seen on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida.
 Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational.
 Third generation miner Frank C. Perham, 84, in West Paris, Maine. The family tradition all started when his grandfather’s cows, moving from one area of a field to another, helped unearth a large feldspar deposit. From there, his grandfather helped get the feldspar mill going in 1926 and his father, Stanley, started a mineral store in 1919. Frank worked with his father when he was growing up and, like his father, earned a geology degree from Bates College. In the 1950s Frank also served a tour in Korea and became very skilled with explosives. Being good at placing explosives gave him work with the state of Maine for road construction projects, but also gave him the opportunity to mine on weekends. The pockets he’s found over the years and discoveries he has made now sit on display at both The Smithsonian and as close as the Maine Mineral and Gem Museum in Bethel, Maine. Frank has given many lectures over the years and also has created a display of many of his finds in the basement of his home, where people stop in to hear his many stories and learn about Maine’s minerals from someone with an unbridled passion for minerals and lifetime of experiences.

Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

The one and only Johnny Mac, photographed at Crusher Pool in The Forks, Maine. At the age of 65, this is Johnny’s 34th consecutive season as a river guide. Normally a job associated with younger people, Johnny doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. “I always said I’d do this until I wasn’t having fun anymore.” He sure seems like he’s still having a good time on the river.

George Dunn, 85, has had a lifelong passion for flying. He first got his license in 1952 and now shares that passion with seven other members of his family who fly and own planes, including his son who now flies KC-135s for the Air National Guard in Bangor. He and his family, known as “The Flying Dunn’s,” have been part of the Beech Hill Pond community for several years—Dunn has lived on the pond, year round, for more than 45 years and hosts an annual Fourth of July event at his hanger that draws more than 1,000 people each year. 

Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

Everard Hall, 72, of Milbridge, Maine. Hall has been digging graves by hand for more than 50 years, and has buried more than 2,400 souls during his work as a gravedigger, including many family members and friends.

Gillian Rose, 88, of Orono, Maine. Rose estimates she’s logged approximately 1K miles on her bike so far this year. In the colder months of the year she stays busy on cross country ski trails. “You do as much as you can for as long as you can,” Rose said. 

Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational. 

Robin Emery, 72, of Lamoine, Maine has been running races for more than 50 years and logged enough miles to circumnavigate the globe one and a half times. Participating in approximately 30 races a year and running every day, she has pushed through physical adversity, such as once suffering a frozen eyeball due to weather conditions (she now runs with ski goggles in colder temps), and also broken through societal norms. When Robin signed up to run her first race in 1972, she was the first woman to ever enter the race. “Women weren’t supposed to sweat or be competitive then,” she said. “It wasn’t feminine.” After entering the race and completing it three years in a row, she was finally given recognition: a basketball trophy, with a man on top. Photographed here in the garage of her family’s home since the early 1900s, Robin’s house is now filled with a life story of trophies, medals, race photos , plaques and memories from the myriad races she’s won and participated in over the decades. Robin, who also was an elementary school teacher for more than 50 years, has a long-standing legacy in Maine. She was the second woman to ever be inducted into the Maine Running Hall of Fame, and also has a trophy named after her at that same Labor Day race.

The one and only Johnny Mac, photographed at Crusher Pool in The Forks, Maine. At the age of 65, this is Johnny’s 34th consecutive season as a river guide. Normally a job associated with younger people, Johnny doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. “I always said I’d do this until I wasn’t having fun anymore.” He sure seems like he’s still having a good time on the river.

Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational.

Ed Hendrickson, 98, of Brewer, Maine, still plans to do some downhill skiing once the snow starts to fly; in 2003 Hendrickson was the recipient of Sugarloaf’s Paul Schipper’s Iron Man Award. While he's been an avid skier most of his life and the dean of students at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute for 17 years, he was also a naval dive-bomber in WWII. Ed flew (and on a couple occasions) had to crash-land planes he was flying. In combat Hendrickson flew SB2C Helldivers. Over the span of just a few days, he shot down one enemy plane only to be hit by enemy fire a couple days later, losing his landing gear on one side, and crash-landing on an aircraft carrier--just the 14th aircraft carrier ever built, according to Hendrickson. "After they took the gun camera off the plane, they just pushed it overboard," he said. "That's just how they did things." On a previous occasion he wasn't able to land on the carrier and ended up careening off into a lake, where he narrowly escaped being dragged 130 feet to the bottom with his plane. That particular plane, a Douglass SBD Dauntless, was brought back to the surface in the 1990s and now can be seen on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida. 

Avid outdoorsman, Bob Lombardo, 69, photographed in Orono, Maine. Bob spends much of his time on trails, either out working on target practice shooting rotten tree stumps with the arrows he makes or on one of his many bikes.

Everard Hall, 72, of Milbridge, Maine. Hall has been digging graves by hand for more than 50 years, and has buried more than 2,400 souls during his work as a gravedigger, including many family members and friends.

Andy Gove, an 88-year-old lobsterman from Stonington, Maine. Still actively out setting traps, Gove got his first lobster license in 1937. Gove has been working in the same harbor since he was a boy and his vast knowledge of the water and the region has earned him accolades in search and rescue operations when the Coast Guard asks for his help.

Gillian Rose, 88, of Orono, Maine. Rose estimates she’s logged approximately 1K miles on her bike so far this year. In the colder months of the year she stays busy on cross country ski trails. “You do as much as you can for as long as you can,” Rose said.

George Dunn and his wife Donna have been together 63 years and living on the pond for more than 45 of those years. George Dunn, 85, has had a lifelong passion for flying. He first got his license in 1952 and now shares that passion with seven other members of his family who fly and own planes, including his son who now flies KC-135s for the Air National Guard in Bangor. He and his family, known as “The Flying Dunn’s,” have been part of the Beech Hill Pond community for several years—Dunn has lived on the pond, year round, for more than 45 years and hosts an annual Fourth of July event at his hanger that draws more than 1,000 people each year.

Ed Hendrickson, 98, of Brewer, Maine, still plans to do some downhill skiing once the snow starts to fly; in 2003 Hendrickson was the recipient of Sugarloaf’s Paul Schipper’s Iron Man Award. While he's been an avid skier most of his life and the dean of students at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute for 17 years, he was also a naval dive-bomber in WWII. Ed flew (and on a couple occasions) had to crash-land planes he was flying. In combat Hendrickson flew SB2C Helldivers. Over the span of just a few days, he shot down one enemy plane only to be hit by enemy fire a couple days later, losing his landing gear on one side, and crash-landing on an aircraft carrier--just the 14th aircraft carrier ever built, according to Hendrickson. "After they took the gun camera off the plane, they just pushed it overboard," he said. "That's just how they did things." On a previous occasion he wasn't able to land on the carrier and ended up careening off into a lake, where he narrowly escaped being dragged 130 feet to the bottom with his plane. That particular plane, a Douglass SBD Dauntless, was brought back to the surface in the 1990s and now can be seen on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida.

Ann Bradford, 82, has been hiking to the summit of each of Acadia National Park’s 28 peaks every summer since she was 75. Her love for this park and Mount Desert Island is profound and inspirational.

Third generation miner Frank C. Perham, 84, in West Paris, Maine. The family tradition all started when his grandfather’s cows, moving from one area of a field to another, helped unearth a large feldspar deposit. From there, his grandfather helped get the feldspar mill going in 1926 and his father, Stanley, started a mineral store in 1919. Frank worked with his father when he was growing up and, like his father, earned a geology degree from Bates College. In the 1950s Frank also served a tour in Korea and became very skilled with explosives. Being good at placing explosives gave him work with the state of Maine for road construction projects, but also gave him the opportunity to mine on weekends. The pockets he’s found over the years and discoveries he has made now sit on display at both The Smithsonian and as close as the Maine Mineral and Gem Museum in Bethel, Maine. Frank has given many lectures over the years and also has created a display of many of his finds in the basement of his home, where people stop in to hear his many stories and learn about Maine’s minerals from someone with an unbridled passion for minerals and lifetime of experiences.

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